UE Systems UK & Ireland

Phone: +44 (0) 7930 352 188 Email: chrish@uesystems.com

Vibration analysis has been for many years the technology of choice for maintenance professionals to monitor the condition of rotating assets. However, in the last years ultrasound has also emerged as a very popular technology for condition monitoring. The question that many are now asking themselves is: which one is best? Ultrasound or vibration? In this article we will focus on the role of ultrasound as a condition monitoring tool, and why using vibration and ultrasound together is the best way to reach excellence in your maintenance practices.

Out of all contaminants known to affect bearing life, water arguably does the most harm. It only takes a small amount to lessen the oil’s ability to properly do its job, creating friction, oxidation and more. Recognizing water-related failure modes can help you determine the optimum lubricants, seals and bearings to protect your equipment’s oil.

Ultrasound is the most versatile predictive maintenance technology available. Typical applications include compressed air and vacuum leak detection, steam traps, valves, and various condition monitoring applications. One application in particular that has seen the most increase in usage in over the last few years is for the inspection of energised electrical components.

What if we could lubricate our bearings remotely, from any device, making sure that the right amount and right lubricant are always used – and even better, based on bearing condition? Then we would address the 3 main lubrication issues, which cause most of early bearing failures. Today, this is already possible.

UE Systems would like to invite you to participate on our webinar which will cover the following subject: IIoT Bearing Lubrication and Health Monitoring Solutions.

When a powerful and versatile technology such as ultrasound meets the internet of things, new solutions arise that will take condition monitoring of assets to a whole new level. The development of ultrasonic sensors and their integration with data collection points promise to be a game changer when it comes to continuous and remote monitoring of industrial assets.

Case study: An inspection with an ultrasound instrument was carried out on a site with a newly installed oven dryer. This was a large drum oven, about 20m long by 5m wide, rotated by four large motors, each of them having two large sets of bearings. The motors were rotating at a speed of around 7-10 rpm, so that this was a case of extreme slow speed bearings.

UE Systems would like to invite you to participate on our webinar which will cover the following subject: Energy Conservation – Using Ultrasound to Improve your Steam System.

UE Systems would like to invite you to participate on our webinar which will cover the following subject: Energy Conservation – Utilising Ultrasound to improve your plants Energy Usage.

UE Systems would like to invite you to participate on our webinar which will cover the following subject: Electrical Inspections: Ultrasound as a great addition to your Thermal Imaging Inspections

Case Study: Ultrasound technology has become one of the essential tools in predictive maintenance, condition monitoring and reliability, due to its quick learning curve, ease of use and flexibility, as this article from UE systems outlines

UE Systems would like to invite you to participate on our webinar which will cover the following subject: Mechanical Inspection: A Deep Dive into Ultrasound use on Rotating Assets.

UE Systems would like to invite you to participate on our webinar which will cover the following subject: Airborne/Structure Borne Ultrasound as part of your Predictive Maintenance Program.

Historically, condition monitoring of balanced machine bogie wheel bearings has been challenging, due to the very slow speed rotation and furthermore, in most cases, the variable speed adds even further complication.

High energy prices and global competition dictate a need to reduce energy waste and improve system efficiencies whenever possible. Steam, aside from being one of the costliest utilities in plants, is an essential component of product quality in many processing industries. Christopher Hallum, UE Systems Regional Manager UK & Ireland explains.

One of today’s greatest challenges for maintenance & reliability teams is to improve energy efficiency – high energy prices and global competition dictate a need to reduce energy waste and improve system efficiencies whenever possible. A major contributor to energy waste is leaks: both in compressed air systems and steam traps. Ultrasound inspection instruments can detect these leaks, leading to potential energy savings.

An effective predictive maintenance strategy leverages technology and analytic data to allow for optimized scheduling of corrective maintenance tasks. The goals of these programs are to reduce asset downtime, prevent unexpected failures, promote productivity and increase the safety of personnel.

One of today’s greatest challenges for maintenance and reliability teams is to improve energy efficiency – high energy prices and global competition dictate a need to reduce energy waste and improve system efficiencies whenever possible. A major contributor to energy waste is leaks: both in compressed air systems and steam traps. Ultrasound inspection instruments can easily detect these leaks, leading to potential energy savings.

Keeping a handle on lubrication is easy, right? All one needs to do is make sure the right lubricant is used in the right amount and at the right time. Not so fast; if only it were that simple.

Airborne and structure-borne ultrasound is a technology that has been around for more than 50 years. In the technology’s early days, the main application was compressed air leak detection. Even today, that is still the most widely used application for airborne ultrasound. Advancements in leak detection using ultrasound have come by way of reporting and documenting the air leaks that are found. The reports quantify the air leaks by showing the cost and CFM loss related with the air leak. UE Systems’ Adrian Messer, CMRP, reports.

The ability to monitor the condition of assets 24/7, from any location, is becoming the new trend in maintenance practices. Ultrasound, being a key technology in condition monitoring, will play a key role in this trend. UE Systems’ Adrian Messer CMRP, reports.

Bearings are essential to any facility’s continued operation. That’s why lubrication is so critical for reliability maintenance engineering and physical asset management.

Leaks can form practically anywhere in a plant. This includes pressurised systems and systems under a vacuum. Leaks can occur internally through valves and steam traps, in heat exchanger and condenser tubes or to the atmosphere. While it is important to locate potential safety hazards from leaks, the loss of gases through leaks can be very costly.

Ultrasound and infrared technologies are a perfect match when conducting inspections of electrical equipment. At any voltage, thermal anomalies and sources of ultrasound such as tracking and arcing can occur. Corona can also occur at 1000 volts and greater. Any of these conditions threaten the reliability of the equipment being inspected.

Vibration analysis has long been the instrument of choice to use for bearings and other rotating equipment. Increasingly, ultrasound is being used in conjunction with vibration analysis to help technicians confirm the condition of mechanical assets. Ultrasound is especially useful with applications where vibration normally cannot help, such as condition-based lubrication and the inspection of slow speed bearings.

Everybody wants a reliable plant with a predictable maintenance schedule and a key part of achieving that goal is to ensure that your lubrication program is organized, well-funded and employing the best practices across the board. What are those, and how will they affect your plant’s reliability? Here are a couple of things to keep in mind.

Contrary to what some might think, compressed air is not free. In fact, for what it takes to produce it, the compressed air that is generated is often considered the most expensive utility in a typical manufacturing facility: air compressor experts have also estimated that as much as 30% of the compressed air generated is lost via leaks.

Failed assets can quickly ruin your day. As any facility manager can attest, an asset that fails unexpectedly takes time and money away from the business. With the right tools and methods, however, any maintenance team can detect and solve problems within mechanical assets before they break. Here’s how benchmarking and ultrasonic technology can improve how your facility prevents asset failure.

In an industrial setting, assets are everything. A breakdown can cause hours of downtime, and thus hours of lost productivity and lower financial gains. Preventative maintenance is one way facility managers counteract system entropy, but it is not perfect strategy. In some cases, a preventive approach to maintenance can actually lower the overall effectiveness of an asset. In the case of a valve for example, constant tightening can cause premature wear and tear.

The ability to monitor the condition of assets continuously, from any location, is the established trend in maintenance practices. Adrian Messer of UE Systems says ultrasound, as a key technology in condition monitoring, has a crucial role to play.